Crime Scene Tape

VIOLENT CRIMES

In the area of violent crime, authorities are very quick to jump to conclusions.  In the real world, events happen in the moment — so fast.  It is easy to second-guess a person’s reaction in a stressful situation.  Mr. Dickstein forces the police and courts to slow down and examine real-life situations carefully.  Violent crimes require criminal intent.  But was there really criminal intent under these circumstances?  Usually not, actually.  Mistakes and misunderstandings are much more common than actual intentional, purposeful one-sided attacks.

COMMON VIOLENT CRIME CHARGES IN FLORIDA

Dickstein can defend you against charges of:

 

  • Assault & Battery: In Florida, assault and battery are two separate crimes. Assault encompasses threatening someone with harm, while battery involves intentionally violently or offensively touching someone. The victim doesn’t have to prove they were hurt, though serious injuries can lead to harsher charges. There are many degrees of assault and battery offenses, which is why it’s essential to talk with a violent crimes defense attorney right away.

  • Child Abuse: A prosecutor can charge you with a misdemeanor or felony if you harm a child in several ways. Child abuse encompasses knowingly or intentionally causing serious physical or mental harm.

  • Domestic Violence: A prosecutor could charge you with domestic violence if you allegedly committed an assault and battery or other violent crime against a current or former spouse, romantic partner, co-parent, or someone who lives with you. Domestic violence can be a misdemeanor or felony.

  • Gang Violence: A prosecutor can charge you with criminal gang activity if they suspect you committed a crime as part of a group of five or more unified people. Being charged with a violent crime as part of a gang is serious. You face enhanced penalties, which is why you should hire a Tampa violent crimes defense lawyer immediately.

  • Kidnapping: A prosecutor could charge you with felony kidnapping if you allegedly restrain someone in demand ransom, use them as a hostage, commit a sex crime, transport them across stateliness, or force them into servitude.

  • Manslaughter: A prosecutor could charge you with felony manslaughter if you allegedly caused another person’s death, but it was not premeditated.

  • Murder: A prosecutor will charge you with murder if they believe you intentionally took another person’s life or a person’s death occurred while you committed a serious crime.

  • Stalking: A prosecutor will charge you with stalking – a misdemeanor – if someone alleges you’re harassing and terrorizing them.

 

WE CREATE AN AGGRESSIVE DEFENSE

When you face years in prison, you have to mount a strong defense. Never accept that you’ll be convicted or receive a harsh sentence. Instead, work with someone who will fight hard to win the best possible outcome in your case.

Dickstein Law understands the gravity of your situation. It’s essential to avoid a permanent criminal record. If you have previous convictions, you must avoid adding another to your history. It’ll only increase the stigma you face in society. We also realize the damage incarceration does to families. You should be with your loved ones, not isolated from them.

Given the importance of fighting the charges, attorney Dickstein strives to build a comprehensive, aggressive defense. He evaluates all of the facts and looks for the best stance to get your charges reduced or dropped or win an acquittal.

 

He’ll review:

  • Your interactions with the police. Did they violate any of your constitutional rights?

  • The witnesses’ credibility. Did anyone see you commit the crime? Can they prove it?

  • The accusers’ credibility. Just because someone says you did something doesn’t make it true.

  • The likelihood of mistaken identity. Have you been charged because you look like a generic description?

  • Your alibi. Can you prove you were somewhere else at the time of the offense?

  • Racial profiling. Have you been accused of a crime based on your race?

  • The admissibility of the evidence. Is the prosecutor trying to use irrelevant, prejudicial, or illegally obtained evidence?

 

Jonah Dickstein will scrutinize your case from every possible angle. He’ll be candid about your case and the best way to move forward.

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